New Media Faculty Dev. Seminar – FA2010

"Awakening the Digital Imagination" – a Networked Seminar

A Step Closer to "Public"

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Post source: publicintellectual

Hey, happy, happy-ish news! I'm beginning to live my "public" part of intellectual a bit more than in conferences and classrooms (stupid article publishing being so hard and long). I was contacted a while ago by Anna David (I thought it was a joke/spam at first) to talk about my use of reality TV in the classroom, something that I've blogged about at times and been trying to publish here and there.

Well, the article is finally here. I think that it does a fairly good job of giving an overview of the approaches to reality TV including, but not limited to, it's study as a genre in media studies. Since I've shifted my teaching and research to be more of using popular culture in order to get to other academic points, I've felt a bit of the outcast. This did a fairly good job of bring these odd threads together. Maybe I'll propose that TWOP needs a "higher ed" column or Chronicle needs a "Reality TV" column.

Thanks, Anna. I'm sorry that I thought you were porn spam initially.

Post source: JoMama Meets the New Media

These words from Murray struck a chord in me: “The promise is that we will not be crushed by our own knowledge, as the writers at the beginning of this period anticipated, because we will organize it together in a vast distributed and synchronized effort. We will not be mere prisoners of the labyrinth, nor even trail-blazers: we will be the makers of the labyrinth, the gods of our own machines.”   I recognize that at each new dawn of emerging technology, we humans have felt overwhelmed by the amount of information before us, and I think that at this point in time, it is a mistake to blur the lines between information and knowledge.  I see students being crushed by the information that is before them, and being utterly unable to work with that information in order to seek knowledge.  It comes so quickly, so easily, sometimes so spectacularly, that they don’t seem to know how to work with it.  Outside of academia, in the public and the political realm, the sound byte becomes the Truth.

My hope is that the pendulum swings, and that somehow when we are no longer quite so wowed by all this cool stuff, we will get down to the more serious business of using it to enhance and deepen the thinking process, rather than to flatten and trivialize it.  If indeed I am to be a maker of the labyrinth, that will be my choice.

Week One

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Post source: Gail'sNew MediaBlog

It was exciting to hear about the New Media Seminar and what we will be covering in the weeks to come. It was an interesting discussion around Janet Murray’s “Inventing the Medium”. I related to her talking about the traditions of the scientists/engineers and the storytellers/theorists coming together to form a “new medium”. I have seen a lot of very creative things that people have done with technology, so that spoke to me in that respect.

Post source: publicintellectual

Excuse my confusion. I was criticized frequently in graduate seminars that I quibbled too much with the linguistics and bought into the myth of needing to "tear down" or challenge a reading, and I desire to avoid that pit.

However, in the course of reading Murray's introduction, I couldn't help but twitch at certain moments that rankled. Let me give an example.

...the term "new media" is a sign of our current confusion about where these efforts are leading and our breathlessness at the pace of change, particularly in the last two decades of the 20th century. How long will it take before we see the gift for what it is--a single medium of representation, the digital medium, formed by the braided interplay of technical invention and cultural expression a the end of the 20th Century?
She asks a question, and I assume that means an invitation to dialogue. How long will it take indeed?

A "Gift"?
Well, let's set aside the large presumptions that this is a "gift," implying both a singular entity and a "giver," along with the supposition of some measure of benevolence.

A "Braid"?
So, assuming that "new media" is "good", "singular", and a "gift", then we have the issue of whether it is formed by this "braided interplay of technical invention and cultural expression". Like the gift metaphor, the "braid" carries a purposefulness with it that I'm not convinced exists in the new media today. It seems much more like when one tangles a mess of yarn and then has a few people work to untangle it. Some, will take the time to methodically find and work from a loose end and carefully wind the end as they move. Others will grab joints and try to loosen/organize these nexuses. Still others, mostly my son and cats, spend time enjoying themselves. Finally, some might find ends, unravel a bit, knit what they want, and then charge for access.

Whatever the case, new media are not braided together. This is something,
but it's not a braid.

A "We"?
Finally, the question assumes that "we" most/all have access to technologies of production and consumption. Of couse, Murray could be referring to the "we" in the educated, elite, but that appears to reinforce the "us" v "them" mentality that was appropriated by critics of higher education. The simple truth is that the class divides that are increasing carry with them significant digital divides in terms of access and literacy. The ability of peoples without training in the access and understanding in these media have placed them behind the curve that increases term by term to require fundamental knowledge of using computers, e-mail, twitter, Blackboard, and other new media elements.

But, that deals with "selection", which will be a major part of my interest in V. Bush's "As We May Think"

Post source: publicintellectual

Excuse my confusion. I was criticized frequently in graduate seminars that I quibbled too much with the linguistics and bought into the myth of needing to "tear down" or challenge a reading, and I desire to avoid that pit.

However, in the course of reading Murray's introduction, I couldn't help but twitch at certain moments that rankled. Let me give an example.

...the term "new media" is a sign of our current confusion about where these efforts are leading and our breathlessness at the pace of change, particularly in the last two decades of the 20th century. How long will it take before we see the gift for what it is--a single medium of representation, the digital medium, formed by the braided interplay of technical invention and cultural expression a the end of the 20th Century?
She asks a question, and I assume that means an invitation to dialogue. How long will it take indeed?

A "Gift"?
Well, let's set aside the large presumptions that this is a "gift," implying both a singular entity and a "giver," along with the supposition of some measure of benevolence.

A "Braid"?
So, assuming that "new media" is "good", "singular", and a "gift", then we have the issue of whether it is formed by this "braided interplay of technical invention and cultural expression". Like the gift metaphor, the "braid" carries a purposefulness with it that I'm not convinced exists in the new media today. It seems much more like when one tangles a mess of yarn and then has a few people work to untangle it. Some, will take the time to methodically find and work from a loose end and carefully wind the end as they move. Others will grab joints and try to loosen/organize these nexuses. Still others, mostly my son and cats, spend time enjoying themselves. Finally, some might find ends, unravel a bit, knit what they want, and then charge for access.

Whatever the case, new media are not braided together. This is something,
but it's not a braid.

A "We"?
Finally, the question assumes that "we" most/all have access to technologies of production and consumption. Of couse, Murray could be referring to the "we" in the educated, elite, but that appears to reinforce the "us" v "them" mentality that was appropriated by critics of higher education. The simple truth is that the class divides that are increasing carry with them significant digital divides in terms of access and literacy. The ability of peoples without training in the access and understanding in these media have placed them behind the curve that increases term by term to require fundamental knowledge of using computers, e-mail, twitter, Blackboard, and other new media elements.

But, that deals with "selection", which will be a major part of my interest in V. Bush's "As We May Think"

Post source: publicintellectual

Excuse my confusion. I was criticized frequently in graduate seminars that I quibbled too much with the linguistics and bought into the myth of needing to "tear down" or challenge a reading, and I desire to avoid that pit.

However, in the course of reading Murray's introduction, I couldn't help but twitch at certain moments that rankled. Let me give an example.

...the term "new media" is a sign of our current confusion about where these efforts are leading and our breathlessness at the pace of change, particularly in the last two decades of the 20th century. How long will it take before we see the gift for what it is--a single medium of representation, the digital medium, formed by the braided interplay of technical invention and cultural expression a the end of the 20th Century?
She asks a question, and I assume that means an invitation to dialogue. How long will it take indeed?

A "Gift"?
Well, let's set aside the large presumptions that this is a "gift," implying both a singular entity and a "giver," along with the supposition of some measure of benevolence.

A "Braid"?
So, assuming that "new media" is "good", "singular", and a "gift", then we have the issue of whether it is formed by this "braided interplay of technical invention and cultural expression". Like the gift metaphor, the "braid" carries a purposefulness with it that I'm not convinced exists in the new media today. It seems much more like when one tangles a mess of yarn and then has a few people work to untangle it. Some, will take the time to methodically find and work from a loose end and carefully wind the end as they move. Others will grab joints and try to loosen/organize these nexuses. Still others, mostly my son and cats, spend time enjoying themselves. Finally, some might find ends, unravel a bit, knit what they want, and then charge for access.

Whatever the case, new media are not braided together. This is something,
but it's not a braid.

A "We"?
Finally, the question assumes that "we" most/all have access to technologies of production and consumption. Of couse, Murray could be referring to the "we" in the educated, elite, but that appears to reinforce the "us" v "them" mentality that was appropriated by critics of higher education. The simple truth is that the class divides that are increasing carry with them significant digital divides in terms of access and literacy. The ability of peoples without training in the access and understanding in these media have placed them behind the curve that increases term by term to require fundamental knowledge of using computers, e-mail, twitter, Blackboard, and other new media elements.

But, that deals with "selection", which will be a major part of my interest in V. Bush's "As We May Think"

Hello world!

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Post source: New Media Seminar A Petree

Welcome to Eduweb2.0 Blogs. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start blogging!

I am looking forward to exploring further the Web 2.0 tools we recently studied in the faculty summer institute at MCC. I am anxious to see how these tools can enhance student learning and retention in our online courses.

Hello world!

No comments

Post source: New Media Seminar A Petree

Welcome to Eduweb2.0 Blogs. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start blogging!

I am looking forward to exploring further the Web 2.0 tools we recently studied in the faculty summer institute at MCC. I am anxious to see how these tools can enhance student learning and retention in our online courses.

Hello world!

No comments

Post source: New Media Seminar A Petree

Welcome to Eduweb2.0 Blogs. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start blogging!

I am looking forward to exploring further the Web 2.0 tools we recently studied in the faculty summer institute at MCC. I am anxious to see how these tools can enhance student learning and retention in our online courses.

The rest of the story

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Post source: mccmktg

The last paragraph was beautiful!  Friday I scoffed at the comment about the poetry of the last paragraph, but I was reading the last paragraph of our material.   The REAL last paragraph was moving.  It equated the “machine” to a work of art — symphony, book, painting or photograph. The essence of this last paragraph for me was that because humans created it,  the machine is a reflection of us humans and therefore has capacity for magnificence.  But while it can have the beauty of a symphony, it can also be ugly when used to carry the message of the burning of holy books (reflection of an ugly act).  Tonight the machine was beautiful when it brought my daughter and I together in conversation about the Facebook pages of some of my high school friends.  The history and feelings and feelings shared were a direct result of the power of the machine.  Later she shared a YouTube video 

Click here to view the embedded video.

with me and in that sharing there that was an affirmation of the “mothering” she has experienced — truly beautiful.  Thank you, machine.